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Antivaccine nonsense Bad science Cancer Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking

“Naturopathic oncologist” Colleen Huber goes full COVID-19 quack

Colleen Huber has gone full COVID-19 quack, because of course she has. She’s a “naturopathic oncologist,” and it was always to be expected.

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Antivaccine nonsense Cancer Computers and social media Medicine Popular culture Pseudoscience Quackery

IonCleanse foot baths: The confluence of antivaccine nonsense and cancer quackery

Antivax and cancer quackery go together, unfortunately. Here, Orac describes yet another example of this, as the (Not-So)-Thinking Moms promote a fundraiser to pay for quackery, including IonCleanse footpaths, for a young woman with cancer.

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Cancer Complementary and alternative medicine Integrative medicine Medicine Quackery

Trojan horse: Selling “integrative oncology” as science-based

Integrative oncology “integrates” quackery with oncology. Its practitioners, however, frequently delude themselves that their specialty is science-based. A recent review article by two integrative oncologists from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center expresses that delusion perfectly.

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Cancer Naturopathy Quackery

The case of Omer Ahmetovic: Naturopathy, cancer, tragedy, and homicide

Last year, Fikreta Ibrisevic chose a naturopathic quack named Juan Gonzalez to treat her cancer. She had been planning on conventional therapy, but Gonzalez convinced her that “chemo is for losers” and that he could cure her without the toxicity of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. As a result, she died. Her distraught husband Omer Ahmetovic killed the quack. Here’s an update on a truly tragic case that shows why cancer patients should never rely on naturopaths.

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Medicine Politics Quackery

HB 4710: Acupuncturists are trying again to license their quackery—and more

Last month, HB 4710, a bill to license acupuncturists, was considered by the Michigan House of Representatives Health Policy Committee. If passed into law, HB 4710 would do far more than license the quackery that is acupuncture. It would also expand the scope of practice of acupuncturists to include homeopathy, “health coaching”, and dietary advice, and is yet another example of what practitioners of pseudoscientific medicine crave: State-granted legitimacy.

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