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Antivaccine nonsense Autism Bad science Computers and social media Medicine Popular culture Pseudoscience

Antivaccine activity on Twitter: It’s not entirely what you think

Twitter is a favorite place for antivaxers to promote their message. A recent study suggests how the antivaccine Twitter community has changed.

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Antivaccine nonsense Computers and social media Medicine Popular culture Pseudoscience Skepticism/critical thinking

How antimaskers co-opt techniques of scientific data analysis to generate COVID-19 propaganda

There’s a new paper out analyzing how antimask activists weaponize the tools of data visualization and scientific argumentation to produce convincing antimask propaganda. Antimaskers are claiming that it shows that they are more “scientific” than those supporting the consensus viewpoint with respect to COVID-19 and masks. What it really shows is that they are good at weaponizing the tools of data visualization and scientific arguments to come to the conclusions that they want to come to.

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Antivaccine nonsense Computers and social media Medicine Popular culture

Sayer Ji: Outraged that Google views “vaccine safety questions” to be akin to Pizzagate

Sayer Ji is outraged by a “Google Document Dump” that allegedly shows that Google views antivaccine views as being similar to conspiracy theories like Pizzagate, QAnon, Holocaust denial, and the like. I’m surprised that, if these documents are real, Google actually “gets” what antivaccine views are.

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Antivaccine nonsense Bad science Computers and social media Medicine Politics Popular culture

John Ioannidis vs. the “science Kardashian” and critics of the Great Barrington Declaration

John Ioannidis’ “science Kardashian” article is the bad science that keeps demonstrating why we should have no superheroes in science. Ideology can warp any of us.

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Complementary and alternative medicine Computers and social media Integrative medicine Medicine Popular culture Quackery

Facebook joins Google in deprioritizing medical misinformation: Are social media companies finally “getting it”?

Yesterday, social media giant Facebook announced that it was acting against medical misinformation by using keyphrases to deprioritize results promoting misinformation and scams? Is it enough, and is it too late?

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